Types Of Diamond Inclusions

Diamond inclusions are blemishes or imperfections that can occur within a diamond. They can affect the clarity of the diamond and may be visible to the naked eye or under magnification. Some common types of diamond inclusions are:

  • Bearded girdle: A rough or irregular edge on the girdle (the widest part of the diamond)
  • Bruise: A small indentation on the surface of the diamond
  • Cavity: A small, hollow opening in the diamond
  • Cloud: A group of small, cloudy inclusions within the diamond
  • Crystal: A small, transparent mineral that is embedded in the diamond
  • Feather: A small, white or transparent inclusion that resembles a feather
  • Grain center: A small, shiny inclusion that is located in the center of the diamond
  • Intended natural: A small, intentionally created inclusion
  • Internal graining: A series of lines or grooves within the diamond
  • Knot: A small, solid inclusion that is located on the surface of the diamond
  • Laser drill hole: A small, man-made hole that is created using a laser
  • Needle: A small, slender inclusion that looks like a needle
  • Pinpoint: A small, round inclusion that is located on the surface of the diamond
  • Twining twisp: A small, twisted inclusion that looks like a twig

Inclusions can occur during the formation process of the diamond or can be introduced after the diamond has been formed. They can be caused by a variety of factors, including stress, heat, and the presence of other minerals. The presence of inclusions can lower the clarity grade of a diamond and may affect its overall value. However, some inclusions are so small or difficult to see that they do not significantly impact the diamond’s appearance or value.

It is important to note that every diamond will have some level of inclusions, even if they are not visible to the naked eye.

Some Inclusions Decrease Value More Than Others

There are several types of inclusions that can significantly decrease the value of a diamond. In general, inclusions that are large, numerous, or easily visible to the naked eye are more likely to negatively impact the value of the diamond. Here are some examples of inclusions that can be particularly value decreasing:

  1. Black inclusions: Black inclusions, such as carbon spots, can be particularly noticeable and can significantly decrease the value of the diamond.
  2. Large feathers: Large feathers, which are small, white or transparent inclusions that resemble feathers, can be particularly noticeable and can decrease the value of the diamond.
  3. Cavities: Cavities, which are small, hollow openings in the diamond, can be noticeable and can decrease the value of the diamond.
  4. Large clouds: Large clouds, which are groups of small, cloudy inclusions, can be noticeable and can decrease the value of the diamond.
  5. Large crystals: Large crystals, which are small, transparent minerals that are embedded in the diamond, can be noticeable and can decrease the value of the diamond.

And Some Inclusions Decrease Value Less Than Others

Here are some examples of inclusions that tend to decrease the value of a diamond the least:

  1. Pinpoints: Pinpoints are small, round inclusions that are located on the surface of the diamond. They are typically small and not easily visible to the naked eye, and therefore have a lesser impact on the value of the diamond.
  2. Crystals: Crystals are small, transparent minerals that are embedded in the diamond. As long as they are small and not easily visible, they tend to have a lesser impact on the value of the diamond.
  3. Needles: Needles are small, slender inclusions that look like needles. As long as they are few in number and not easily visible, they tend to have a lesser impact on the value of the diamond.
  4. Internal graining: Internal graining is a series of lines or grooves within the diamond. As long as it is not easily visible, it tends to have a lesser impact on the value of the diamond.
  5. Twining twisps: Twining twisps are small, twisted inclusions that look like twigs. As long as they are few in number and not easily visible, they tend to have a lesser impact on the value of the diamond.

It is important to note that the impact of inclusions on the value of a diamond can vary depending on the specific characteristics of the diamond, such as its size, shape, and overall quality. In general, diamonds with fewer and smaller inclusions are more valuable than those with larger or more numerous inclusions.